Die Stimme des Klaviers


Posted: 2009-10-07 18:20   |  More posts about art berlin computers experimental german language germany linguistics news oddities

Peter Ablinger, an Austrian composer currently residing in Berlin, has done something rather interesting: he made a recording of a child reading the Proclamation of the European Environmental Criminal Court, then invented a mechanical piano player capable of reading notes in a very high time resolution from a computer.

The computer performs a frequency analysis of the sound spectrum, aided by Ablinger himself, which is then fed into the piano player and out comes the child's voice.

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(Video in German with English subtitles)

While I wouldn't have much hope for people trying to work out what the piano is "saying" without the aid of seeing the words as they're heard, I think it's a pretty interesting experiment. The auto-player in itself is something to be marvelled at. Neat!

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