Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima (Aphex Remix)


Posted: 2011-11-07 18:29   |  More posts about art music war

Very unsettling.

From its vimeo page:

see original version, conducted by Krzysztof Penderecki himself, performed just before this performance, here = youtube.com/​watch?v=SFoTqF-gGxA&feature=related

see the other Aphex Twin edits for this show here = vimeo.com/​album/​1735255

see all other performances from the show here

youtube.com/​user/​fixedmachine#grid/​user/​CFB3F7A0029A764C

Live visuals by Weirdcore.

gfx programming by weirdcore & andrew benson

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Qaeda Quality Question Quickly Quickly Quiet


Posted: 2010-12-03 23:51   |  More posts about america art film media oddities short film war words

I rather like the "A", "Amer-kawh", "and", "for" and "great" bits.

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For a soldier he leads a very fine life and he always is blessed with a charming young wife


Posted: 2010-07-17 16:01   |  More posts about art ireland music poetry war words

Paul Brady's legendary 1977 recording of the old Irish anti-recruitment song Arthur McBride:

Read more...

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Torture and the media


Posted: 2010-07-01 13:29   |  More posts about america media news politics war

Abstract from Desai, Pineda, Runquist, Fusunyan et al. (2010), emphasis mine:

The current debate over waterboarding has spawned hundreds of newspaper articles in the last two years alone. However, waterboarding has been

the subject of press attention for over a century. Examining the four newspapers

with the highest daily circulation in the country, we found a significant and

sudden shift in how newspapers characterized waterboarding. From the early

1930s until the modern story broke in 2004, the newspapers that covered

waterboarding almost uniformly called the practice torture or implied it was

torture: The New York Times characterized it thus in 81.5% (44 of 54) of articles on

the subject and The Los Angeles Times did so in 96.3% of articles (26 of 27). By

contrast, from 2002‐2008, the studied newspapers almost never referred to

waterboarding as torture. The New York Times called waterboarding torture or

implied it was torture in just 2 of 143 articles (1.4%). The Los Angeles Times did so

in 4.8% of articles (3 of 63). The Wall Street Journal characterized the practice as

torture in just 1 of 63 articles (1.6%). USA Today never called waterboarding

torture or implied it was torture. In addition, the newspapers are much more

likely to call waterboarding torture if a country other than the United States is

the perpetrator. In The New York Times, 85.8% of articles (28 of 33) that dealt with

a country other than the United States using waterboarding called it torture or

implied it was torture while only 7.69% (16 of 208) did so when the United States

was responsible. The Los Angeles Times characterized the practice as torture in

91.3% of articles (21 of 23) when another country was the violator, but in only

11.4% of articles (9 of 79) when the United States was the perpetrator.

Read the entire paper here.

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Rise of the Robots


Posted: 2010-06-12 02:58   |  More posts about america computers politics robotics science war

A good, short blog post from the wonderful ginandtacos blog on the increasing prevalence of unmanned vehicles in war, ending with a very sobering thought:
Won't it be great when the military can send in the tanks without having to put crews in harm's way? Yes and no. The fewer casualties, the better. But what becomes of our reluctance to send the military galavanting around the sordid parts of the world once American casualties are taken out of the equation? We have almost no restraint as it is. I shudder to think of how easily Presidents and legislators will make the decision to go to war when the attitude of "We can just send robots to do it!" becomes entrenched. We saw what the advancements in design of cruise missiles in the 1980s did to the Executive Branch; if someone's acting up, just lob a dozen Tomahawks at them from a few hundred miles away. It became the easy way to intervene without actually making a commitment or putting Americans at risk. Collateral damage isn't much of a deterrent to our political class. UAVs are another step in that direction, a step toward a future with more remotely operated and even autonomous means of doing the dirty work. It's great that technology allows more American soldiers to come home alive and in one piece, but if we remove the U.S. body count from the decision-making process the only restraints on waging war will be common sense, morality, and logic. Yeah, let's start taking bets on how well that works.

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